Integration stars crowned at the Primary Care Awards 2015

Integration stars crowned at the Primary Care Awards

More than 100 healthcare professionals came together to celebrate the best in integration at the inaugural Primary Care Awards 2015 hosted by Primary Care Today and its sister title The Pharmacist.

Awards up for grabs spanned across all primary care professional groups in service provision and commissioning, with one theme running throughout: integration excellence.

Guests were treated to a three-course meal in the glamorous surroundings of the world famous hotel chain in Tower Hill, and heard from primary care leaders – and Primary Care Awards judges – from the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, NHS Clinical Commissioners, Unite the union, National Association of Primary Care, and the Local Optical Committee Support Unit (LOCSU).

Stephanie Davies, nurse practitioner manager at East Norfolk Medical Practice, triumphed as the overall winner on the night, scooping the Integration Inspiration accolade. Awarded the star prize by all five judges, she said: “I am passionate about communicating with our patients and trying new ways to reach out to them

Davies was awarded for her role in leading the diabetic service for her population. In noticing how hard it was to engage young diabetic patients, she set up a text service for young diabetic patients to text in their BM readings to her to receive advice on insulin adjustments.  This reduced the number of times they needed to attend the surgery and enabled them to gain easier access to medical advice. The innovation was highlighted by the CQC following its visit to the practice as an example of outstanding practice.

Other winners on the night were: Castlepoint and Rochford CCG who won CCG of the year, Adrian Anim who was awarded primary care nurse of the year, Irshad Ibrahim who scooped community optometrist of the year, Raymond Charles Hall who won independent community pharmacist of the year, Chirag Nakum who was awarded multiple community pharmacist of the year, Mitesh Badiani who won dentist of the year, John Ribchester, who scooped GP of the year, and Haverstock Healthcare who won GP federation champion.

Obi Amadi, lead professional officer at Unite/CPHVA, told attendees that integration offers the health service the opportunity to really ensure services are centred around the patient.

“In order to do this and get it right it involves all healthcare staff putting the patient perspective at the heart of care. It is also about integration in teams, not about doctors leading and others following,” she said.

“In the past we have all been a little bit protectionist in how we work, we had the mysticism of medicine, only a doctor could take a blood pressure reading, the strict hierarchy in nursing midwifery – matron did the ward round, we talked at the bewildered patient. Well I think we are all glad things have moved on. Now we should be trying to take things as far as we can go and identifying our champions from any discipline.

“Health system integration is one of the organising principles that can benefit patients and communities as well as professionals – the result is better care and better reported experiences of care and care outcomes. What better way to ensure that every contact counts?”

Katrina Venerus, managing director of LOCSU, called on policy makers to take the pressure off hospital care and enable the shift to a cost-efficient community model, and to realise they must exploit the wide range of health professionals to make every contact count to tackle major lifestyle health risks, such as obesity, alcohol and smoking to reduce upstream demand.

“As high-street health hubs, optical practices along with pharmacies and dental surgeries can help deliver those daily interventions at the heart of the community,” said Venerus.

“We should think of optical practices as the front door to NHS eye care. With 2.6 million GP appointments and 270,000 A&E visits attributed to eye-related problems every year, it makes good sense to free up unnecessary time spent in hospital and GP surgeries by using the skills, equipment and availability of optometrists in high-street practices to quickly treat patients at convenient locations.”

 

Q: What are the greatest barriers to integration?

The differing views of health and social care. We need to remember that we are looking after patients and we need to make sure we have a really clear understanding about the drive from each of the organisations.

Trisha O’risis, Castlepoint and Rochford CCG

Communication between different agencies

Stephanie Davies, East Norfolk Medical Practice

Communication is a massive barrier to integration. People not talking to each other and people not sharing information is dangerous because people get harmed.

Adrian Anim, South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust 

One of the foremost things is to get everyone singing from the same page. Getting all the different groups together and having one strategy to help the patient in need. If we are not all on the same page on the best course of action, it is going to be tricky. Communication is key – firstly with the patient and secondly, efficiently communicating to your colleagues.

Irashad Ibrahim

The relationships between pharmacists and general practitioners. I have worked for 53 years trying to make that connection and personally it is fine, individuals do it well, but there really is no overall acceptance that we are all doing the same role and we should be working together. We should be integrating education to change the attitudes early.

Raymond Hall, Hall’s Pharmacy, Hull

People’s mindset. If healthcare professionals can tune themselves in correctly and make it so every contact counts, integration can work.

Chirag Nakum, Rowlands Pharmacy

The government don’t understand the role oral health plays in society. Oral health is the lowest priority.

Mitesh Badiani, Devon dental centre of excellence

Nobody trusts anyone enough to take risks at the moment and with the NHS on its knees we have to take risks.

Dr Michael Smith, Haverstock Healthcare

 

 

Q: How important is integration to the survival of the NHS?

Imperative

Trisha O’risis, Castlepoint and Rochford CCG

If we don’t mix with different agencies, we are not going to move forward and won’t get joined up care.

Stephanie Davies, East Norfolk Medical Practice

Very important. Integration helps people, protects people and saves people and if there is no integration it doesn’t happen.

Adrian Anim, South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust

Working as a team is key, without that – the NHS doesn’t have a leg to stand on.

Irashad Ibrahim

Essential. Each one of us has a skill that we can input and save cash.

Raymond Hall, Hall’s Pharmacy, Hull

Very important – if there is anything that doesn’t work it is fragmentation. We have to make sure everything links together. It is the patient’s journey that matters most. If we don’t integrate properly, then patient care is at risk and that is not what we want.

Chirag Nakum, Rowlands Pharmacy

It is extremely important to integrate so we can care for everyone’s oral health, not just those that can afford it.

Mitesh Badiani, Devon dental centre of excellence

Integration is more important than the NHS: it is important to people’s health.

Dr Michael Smith, Haverstock Healthcare

 

 

Q: What support do you need when working with a more diverse mix of practitioners?

It would be really useful to have a focus on the primary care workforce, primary care funding, the introduction of new roles that will support the integration agenda and also some real investment in enhancing the commissioning skills of our GP colleagues and creating a deeper understanding of commissioning across the piste.

Trisha O’risis, Castlepoint and Rochford CCG

IT is a big issue – we have got rubbish IT systems at the moment that we are in the process of changing. Our IT systems do not talk to each other – they don’t talk to secondary care.

Stephanie Davies, East Norfolk Medical Practice

We work in a system where do shared joint work with people from different Trusts. We can’t see each other’s work or information due to IT issues.

Adrian Anim, South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust

Follow up is key even after referral – find out what happened. It does take work but that liaison with the wider professional network is important.

Irashad Ibrahim

More meetings where you are meeting during work time. While GPs can close for an afternoon to have a meeting, pharmacists can’t do that.

Raymond Hall, Hall’s Pharmacy, Hull

Making the contact with other healthcare professionals – put a face to a phone call.

Chirag Nakum, Rowlands Pharmacy

Clinicians must keep up-to-date

Mitesh Badiani, Devon dental centre of excellence

 

Primary Care 2015 Winners

Clinical Commissioning Group of the Year Award

Winner: Castlepoint and Rochford CCG

Judge: Julie Wood, NHS Clinical Commissioners

 

Practice Nurse of the Year Award

Winner: Stephanie Davies Newtown surgery

Judge: Obi Amadi, Unite/CPHVA

Sponsor: Vodafone

 

Primary Care Nurse of the Year Award

Winner: Adrian Anim South Tyneside

Judge: Obi Amadi, Unite/CPHVA

Sponsor: Vodafone

 

Community Optometrist of the Year Award

Winner: Irshad Ibrahim

Judge: Katrina Venerus, Local Optical Committee Support Unit

 

Independent Community Pharmacist of the Year Award

Winner: Raymond Charles Hall – Halls Pharmacy

Judge: Ash Soni, Royal Pharmaceutical Society

Sponsor: Alliance

 

Multiple Community Pharmacist of the Year Award

Winner: Chirag – Rowlands Pharmacy

Judge: Ash Soni, Royal Pharmaceutical Society

Sponsor: Alliance

“Alliance are delighted to support the event – it has been a great opportunity for networking, it has been a thoroughly enjoyable evening and we hope we can play our part along the integration process as well.”

Kevin Loughrie, Alliance 

 

Dentist of the Year Award

Mitesh Badiani Devon dental centre of excellence

 

GP of the Year Award

John Ribchester Whitstable medical practice

Judge: David Colin-Thome, National Association of Primary Care

 

GP Federation Champion Award

Haverstock Healthcare

Judge: David Colin-Thome, National Association of Primary Care

 

Integration Inspiration

Winner: Stephanie Davies Newtown surgery

 

Attendees at the Primary Care Awards 2015 were asked to snap their most creative selfies using the props in their gift bags to be in with a chance to win a Michael Kors watch and theatre tickets to In the Heights.

Winners are:

Julia Rogers has won the Michael Kors Watch

Irshad Ibrahim has won the tickets to see In the Heights

 

CONGRATULATIONS!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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